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Robertson - Answered a Question by Perkins (16 Aug 08 11:05)

Don't worry, just book another cruise to rectify it!!!!

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Neil Down - Answered a Question by Perkins (14 Aug 08 17:09)

This often found and it is to do with the fluid in the ears and the cilia still reacting after a prolonged period of unusual activity. It normally goes off after a day or two but some people have reported it lasting up to two weeks but it is nothing to worry about. . Neil.

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Smith - Answered a Question by Perkins (14 Aug 08 17:15)

Dont worry about it mate, I had exactly the same thing. Working down corridors is the weirdest as you feel you are still swaying. It sill soon stop.

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Brierley - Answered a Question by Perkins (14 Aug 08 18:45)

I had this feeling once, unfortunately I was on a Mount Teide tour in Tenerife, and to have that feeling on top of a volcano was most disconcerting. But the feeling passed very quickly.

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Wilba - Answered a Question by Perkins (14 Aug 08 20:43)

Like Neil says, It's all in the ears. The balance mechanism in the ear gets locked in us Landlubbers due to lack of use. As we spend time on the ship the balance mechanism 'unlocks' & we notice the ships movement less & less as the cruise goes on. When we step back on land the whole thing has to readjust to the change. In sailors & pilots the balance system gets used to the constant change of land sea & air movement & that is the main reason they do not suffer sea/air sickness.

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Clarke - Answered a Question by Perkins (14 Aug 08 20:53)

Don't worry. It took about 2 weeks for me to feel better. I had it really badly after just 7 days at seas. It was quite dis-orientating as I couldn't walk in a straight line across the office. Have just come back from a 2 day mini cruise but thankfully it only lasted a few hours this time. Hope you feel better soon.

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stevens - Answered a Question by Perkins (16 Aug 08 15:15)

It's great fun. You will all be laughing as you walk down Le Corridor! As most ships seem to have these endless corridors. It's as though you have had many, many too drinks extra. When you get on dry land you will still be swaying, possibly even when you get home. Many times I have woken up in in bed at home and STILL felt all at sea. Again I say it's great fun.

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Collins - Answered a Question by Perkins (16 Aug 08 17:19)

It called you sea legs, you adjust on the ship but your body takes a little longer to adjust when on land. I liken it to walking down stairs carrying something and missing the last step, enjoy it will remind you of your holiday.

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Setter - Answered a Question by Perkins (17 Aug 08 15:29)

I think the majority of us get it, some to a greater degree than others! I keep swaying for several days; my Husband is over it in a day or so. Regard it as changing from your sea legs to your land legs, and start planning your next cruise---you can have a nice little sit-down with all the brochures, when you wont feel "wobbly" at all--- except maybe at the cost if you decide to go mad and book a suite!

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